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Does nature have a price?

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

You may not be familiar with the terms ‘ecosystem services’ and ‘natural capital,’ but they are words that are becoming increasingly present in discussions regarding nature conservation and can cause major divisions in opinion between environmentalists. Read More

Biodiversity now below safe levels, new study shows

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Scientists have estimated that the variety of animals and plants has fallen to dangerous levels across 58.1% of the world’s landmass, and that biodiversity loss is no longer within the safe limit suggested by ecologists. Read More

Ecology of the Mandrare Valley in Southern Madagascar

Friday, July 15, 2016

Madagascar is a fascinating place due to the abundance of plants and animals that are found nowhere else on earth. Madagascar is the fourth largest island in the world and a mere 250 miles off the coast of mainland Africa. However, it remains a largely undiscovered corner of the continent.  Read More

Barn owls benefit from conservation efforts

Monday, July 11, 2016

Barn owls are a popular yet mysterious bird species which, if seen at all, are most likely glimpsed gliding like ghosts over crops at dusk. Their screeches can send shivers down anyone’s spine. They are incredible hunters with huge eyes and sharp talons, yet they have suffered population declines in the UK. This has mainly been attributed to changes in farming practices and possible effects of pesticides such as DDT. Read More

Tree assessment is looking up

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Arborists experienced in preparing reports in support of planning applications will be familiar with BS5837:2012 Trees in Relation to Design, Demolition and Construction – Recommendations.  Read More

eDNA analysis for great crested newts

Friday, May 06, 2016

Environmental DNA (eDNA) is now being used predominantly for determining the presence or likely absence of rare, invasive or protected species in freshwater habitats, such as the great crested newt (GCN). Read More

Bluebells - a fascinating past, but an uncertain future?

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Along with hay fever and suddenly driving to work in daylight, one of the signs that spring has arrived for me is the arrival of flowering bluebells (Hyacinthoids non-scripta). Every spring the dormant bulbs awaken in the depths of the soil and release shoots which rise up to the surface to form a carpet of thin green leaves.  Read More