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Badgers - the basics!

Friday, October 07, 2016

Forever immortalised within popular literature such as Wind in the Willows and The Animals of Farthing Wood, the badger (Meles meles) is a highly social mammal, and one of the largest members of the Mustelid family. In celebration of National Badger Day on the 6th October 2016 this article will provide a brief overview of the ecology of badgers and their legal protection.  Read More

Barn owl recommendations

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Like most wild birds, the barn owl is protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act (WCA) 1981, as amended. This makes it an offence to kill, injure or take a barn owl; take, damage or destroy the nest while that nest is in use or being built; and to take or destroy an egg.  Read More

The 2016 State of Nature report published

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

The 2016 State of Nature report was published last week. The report is designed to give an overview of the state of nature in the UK, its seas, Crown Dependencies and Overseas Territories, consolidating data from 53 conservation and research organisations, and David Attenborough was one of the initiators of this regular review.
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Good news for the speckled wood butterfly

Tuesday, September 06, 2016

With all the gloomy stories that we normally read in the news about global warming and population declines, it’s refreshing to read that populations of the speckled wood butterfly are booming.  Read More

Avoid, minimise and …?

Thursday, August 25, 2016

The principle behind the National Planning Policy Framework aims for projects to avoid detrimental impacts on biodiversity, minimise these wherever possible, mitigate their effect where they cannot be avoided, and compensate for any residual impacts. What is compensation, how is this achieved and what processes are in place? Read More

Bat detectors - one of our favourite bits of kit!

Thursday, August 18, 2016

In 1790 an Italian scientist named Lazzaro Spallanzi was intrigued by the ability of bats to forage for insects at night. In an attempt to understand how they performed this remarkable feat he undertook several experiments. He found that blindfolded the bats flew unimpaired, but when they had their ears plugged they would fly into objects which they would otherwise have avoided. Since the bats appeared to be flying in silence, he could not understand why hearing was playing such an important role in their navigation. Read More

World Lizard Day - 14th August!

Friday, August 12, 2016

The United Kingdom supports three native species of lizard, ranging from the friendly and inquisitive viviparous or common lizard (Zootoca vivipara) to the majestic sand lizard (Lacerta agilis) to the legless and secretive slow worm (Anguis fragilis).  Read More