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Combining surveys saves time and money for your project

Tuesday, June 06, 2017

At Thomson Ecology, we are keen to assist our clients from the first email or telephone conversation right through to the end of a project, and beyond. We understand the ecological constraints that you have on site and we want to ensure that planning consent is achieved, as well as saving you time and money. Read More

The Nathusius’ pipistrelle

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

In the British Isles, Nathusius’ pipistrelle bat (Pipistrellus nathusii) is relatively rare but widely distributed. It can be found throughout Europe as far east as the border with Turkey, west towards Northern Spain and north towards Finland. Nathusius’ pipistrelle was first seen on the Shetland Isles in 1940 and then later in Ireland in 1996 when a single bat was found grounded in Belfast. The species was initially thought of as a vagrant species with no fixed abode. By 1991, the species was defined as a migrant winter visitor. Mating of this species was later confirmed and three maternity colonies were discovered between 1997 and 2001 in Lincolnshire and Northern Ireland.  Read More

Celebrating International Bat Night

Friday, August 26, 2016

International Bat Night (the 29th August) is a time to celebrate this marvel of the natural world – flying mammals. Bats account for nearly one quarter of the mammals found throughout the world, which equates to approximately 1300 species, and are found in the ‘old world’ – Africa - and the ‘New World’ – the Americas - and everywhere else in-between - other than Antarctica.  Read More

Bat detectors - one of our favourite bits of kit!

Thursday, August 18, 2016

In 1790 an Italian scientist named Lazzaro Spallanzi was intrigued by the ability of bats to forage for insects at night. In an attempt to understand how they performed this remarkable feat he undertook several experiments. He found that blindfolded the bats flew unimpaired, but when they had their ears plugged they would fly into objects which they would otherwise have avoided. Since the bats appeared to be flying in silence, he could not understand why hearing was playing such an important role in their navigation. Read More

Thomson's bat specialists join Network Rail's orange army!

Monday, March 28, 2016

Thomson Ecology’s team of bat specialists joined the Network Rail ‘orange army’ in the Severn Tunnel to carry out a survey for bat roosts in the 4 mile long tunnel, ahead of drilling works to facilitate the electrification of the railway. Read More