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Going…going…gone?

Friday, July 28, 2017

A 2015 study has shown that Earth has entered an era of mass extinction - unparalleled since the dinosaurs died out 66 million years ago along with 75% of all life.  Read More

Do trees and hedges really clean our air?

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Have you ever wondered what the point is of having street trees or roadside hedgerows? Well, apart from providing an important habitat for breeding and foraging birds and insects, and providing attractive and calming places for people, they also play an important role in protecting us from pollution. Read More

When do you employ a landscape architect?

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Recently I have moved into a more senior role in our landscape architecture team at Thomson Ecology. At the same time I have passed my Chartership exam and so am, in general, feeling very pleased with myself and like I know it all.  Read More

Ragweed on the rise

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

We are used to hearing about how climate change and global warming are leading to rising sea levels, warming oceans and retreating glaciers, but did you know that it may also cause a rise in hay fever?! Read More

The power of nature…

Friday, June 16, 2017

We invented the wheel, the computer, have mastered flight and even landed on the moon, but are we really the most powerful species? Read More

Combining surveys saves time and money for your project

Tuesday, June 06, 2017

At Thomson Ecology, we are keen to assist our clients from the first email or telephone conversation right through to the end of a project, and beyond. We understand the ecological constraints that you have on site and we want to ensure that planning consent is achieved, as well as saving you time and money. Read More

Reptile Personalities

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

I have always been interested in the subject of animal behaviour and find the growing research into the ecological impacts of behaviour and personality an interesting development within the field of ecology. Whilst most of this research focuses heavily on larger mammals, particularly primates, there is behavioural research available on some of the smaller, less charismatic species that we encounter regularly as ecologists in the UK. The common lizard, (Lacerta vivipara) is an example of such a species.  Read More