Return to Thomson Group

01483 466 000

enquiries@thomsonecology.com

Blog

Help for hedgehogs

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) have declined by 97 per cent in Britain over the last 70 years, from 35 million in the 1950s to just under one million today.  Read More

Snap happy!

Monday, January 23, 2017

With the miniaturisation of electronics the camera trap has become an excellent survey technique, a 24 hour night or day recording service that can be used in its own right as a survey method or to supplement survey techniques in a variety of situations. The ultimate aim is to improve the accuracy of biological recording on a site in one, or multiple locations.  Read More

Discovering dormice

Monday, January 16, 2017

The third weekend in November marked the last dormouse nestbox checks of the year for the National Dormouse Monitoring Programme (NDMP). As the nights drew in and the frosts appeared, dormice, along with many other animals, started to hibernate. The NDMP will begin again in March with a spring clean of the nesting boxes.  Read More

Citizen science – power to the people!

Tuesday, December 06, 2016

Citizen science is simply the involvement of volunteers in science. People of all ages and varying levels of expertise can participate and there is often no special knowledge or equipment necessary.  Read More

Beavers are back

Monday, November 28, 2016

Last week the Scottish Government formally announced that the Eurasian beaver (Castor fiber) is to be officially recognised as a native species 400 years after being hunted to extinction.  Read More

Watching briefs should not be left until the last minute!

Monday, November 14, 2016

Watching briefs are an integral aspect of ecology site work and should be planned for in advance to ensure that ecologists with the necessary competencies will be available. For example, an ecologist with a great crested newt licence, or a bat licence, may be needed.  Read More

Bat detectors - one of our favourite bits of kit!

Thursday, August 18, 2016

In 1790 an Italian scientist named Lazzaro Spallanzi was intrigued by the ability of bats to forage for insects at night. In an attempt to understand how they performed this remarkable feat he undertook several experiments. He found that blindfolded the bats flew unimpaired, but when they had their ears plugged they would fly into objects which they would otherwise have avoided. Since the bats appeared to be flying in silence, he could not understand why hearing was playing such an important role in their navigation. Read More

World Snake Day - July 16th

Tuesday, August 02, 2016

July 16th was World Snake Day! While snakes are threatened by many of the same issues that affect a range of wildlife - habitat loss and fragmentation, road mortality, climate change and disease - persecution and negative attitudes toward snakes may be the biggest barrier to their conservation. To celebrate World Snake Day, read on for a few facts about Great Britain’s native scaly friends..... Read More

eDNA analysis for great crested newts

Friday, May 06, 2016

Environmental DNA (eDNA) is now being used predominantly for determining the presence or likely absence of rare, invasive or protected species in freshwater habitats, such as the great crested newt (GCN). Read More

Tree-hugging eco-warrior or pragmatic consultant?

Monday, April 18, 2016

The other day a client referred to me and my team as eco-warriors (and advance apologies if you’re now reading this!). Although I’m sure no harm was meant by it, I was very disappointed that after 10 years in the industry working hard to support my clients, ecological consultants are still viewed as tree-hugging warriors wearing tie-dyed clothes. Read More