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Combining surveys saves time and money for your project

Tuesday, June 06, 2017

At Thomson Ecology, we are keen to assist our clients from the first email or telephone conversation right through to the end of a project, and beyond. We understand the ecological constraints that you have on site and we want to ensure that planning consent is achieved, as well as saving you time and money. Read More

Reptile Personalities

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

I have always been interested in the subject of animal behaviour and find the growing research into the ecological impacts of behaviour and personality an interesting development within the field of ecology. Whilst most of this research focuses heavily on larger mammals, particularly primates, there is behavioural research available on some of the smaller, less charismatic species that we encounter regularly as ecologists in the UK. The common lizard, (Lacerta vivipara) is an example of such a species.  Read More

Local dormouse monitoring continues

Tuesday, May 02, 2017

As relaxation and to help the endangered dormouse population, our ecologists have enjoyed a busman’s holiday. On Sunday we checked our local dormouse boxes, as part of the National Dormouse Monitoring Programme (NDMP). The programme has been set up to monitor dormouse boxes in 350 locations around Britain. Thomson Ecology monitors 50 dormouse boxes in an area of woodland in Merrow, Surrey.  Read More

Snap happy!

Monday, January 23, 2017

With the miniaturisation of electronics the camera trap has become an excellent survey technique, a 24 hour night or day recording service that can be used in its own right as a survey method or to supplement survey techniques in a variety of situations. The ultimate aim is to improve the accuracy of biological recording on a site in one, or multiple locations.  Read More

Citizen science – power to the people!

Tuesday, December 06, 2016

Citizen science is simply the involvement of volunteers in science. People of all ages and varying levels of expertise can participate and there is often no special knowledge or equipment necessary.  Read More

Watching briefs should not be left until the last minute!

Monday, November 14, 2016

Watching briefs are an integral aspect of ecology site work and should be planned for in advance to ensure that ecologists with the necessary competencies will be available. For example, an ecologist with a great crested newt licence, or a bat licence, may be needed.  Read More

Bat detectors - one of our favourite bits of kit!

Thursday, August 18, 2016

In 1790 an Italian scientist named Lazzaro Spallanzi was intrigued by the ability of bats to forage for insects at night. In an attempt to understand how they performed this remarkable feat he undertook several experiments. He found that blindfolded the bats flew unimpaired, but when they had their ears plugged they would fly into objects which they would otherwise have avoided. Since the bats appeared to be flying in silence, he could not understand why hearing was playing such an important role in their navigation. Read More

eDNA analysis for great crested newts

Friday, May 06, 2016

Environmental DNA (eDNA) is now being used predominantly for determining the presence or likely absence of rare, invasive or protected species in freshwater habitats, such as the great crested newt (GCN). Read More

Newt season kicks off

Friday, April 01, 2016

It’s day one and I’ve loaded up one of Thomson Ecology’s Land Rovers with approximately 350 bottle traps and bamboo canes. I’ve got the maps, risk assessments and travel details. Read More